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  • Writer's pictureBright Wisdom

From Doubt to Confidence: My Journey as an Interpreter in Canberra

Now relieved that I survived, lol, I can finally sit down and write this blog.

I just returned home from a short trip to Canberra, where I worked as an interpreter for a two-day meeting with people from the Ministry of Home Affairs and some officers from South Korea.





The meetings were intense, covering a wide range of topics. From 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. each day, there were numerous presentations, questions, and answers. Due to the nature of the work, I can’t share specific content, but I can say that I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity and have once again realized the power of meditation.


As with any interpreting work, studying the subject matter beforehand is essential. Knowing the language alone isn’t enough; without context, communication can falter. This assignment was particularly challenging because it involved government administrative and operational measures, a field entirely new to me.


I was nervous and unsure if I was the right person for the job.



interpreter's study notes

However, I decided to embrace the opportunity and give it my best shot.


Once the assignment was confirmed, I received the meeting details and preparatory materials. I had to learn a lot to prepare, and at times, I doubted my ability to handle the task.


Whenever these doubts crept in, I meditated and discarded those negative thoughts.




Rather than dwell on doubt, I chose to spend the time learning more.

Throughout the workshop, there were moments when the presenter’s words flew over my head, and I had to ask for clarification. Occasionally, I chose words I later felt were not the most accurate. In those moments, I reminded myself to let go of any negative thoughts and emotions, which helped me stay calm and focused.


Australian Bureau of Statistics, Canberra
Australian Bureau of Statistics, Canberra

When the workshop concluded, I felt relieved and glad it was over. I thought I did an okay job but nothing extraordinary.


I wouldn’t give myself top marks for my interpretation work over the two days.


However, the officers from Korea appreciated my work immensely. They said that my efforts contributed to bettering and developing Korea, something I hadn’t considered. I was so focused on whether I used the right words that I didn’t see the bigger picture.



Realizing the impact of my work made me feel grateful and gave me a new perspective.

They even mentioned they would invite me as an interpreter again if they returned to Australia. I jokingly replied, "Oh, no, please don’t. Once is enough. Haha."


Although the work was intensive and challenging, I am very grateful for the opportunity to contribute to something that could benefit Korea in the long run. I am also thankful for meditation, which kept me calm and free from negative thoughts throughout the meetings.


Whether I will take on a similar task again, I’m not sure. For now, I want to relax, enjoy, and feel proud of the work I accomplished. :-)





Canberra
Canberra




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6 Comments


Chris Taylor
Chris Taylor
Jul 05

Awesome Robin, can’t help but be curious about what the work was for 😁

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Bright Wisdom
Bright Wisdom
Jul 05
Replying to

😂 oh, hahaha

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Guest
Jul 05

Well done Robin.

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Bright Wisdom
Bright Wisdom
Jul 05
Replying to

Thank you 😊🙏

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David Clouston
David Clouston
Jul 03

Sounds like a very interesting assignment! Well done Robin

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Bright Wisdom
Bright Wisdom
Jul 03
Replying to

Yes it was! Thank you for reading 😊

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